Seven descriptions of good biblical theology

     As a final note to conclude our four part study on the elements of full-time ministry, Derek Thomas challenges us with seven descriptions of what good theology should look like. My challenge to you who may be pursuing full-time ministry and even to all Christians in general is to consider carefully these seven descriptions of good theology and compare them to how you think:

  1. Accurate– This is a given. You will always want your theology to be accurate and according to Scripture.
  2. God Centered– All of your theological thought and discourse should be focused around God, the author and sustainer of life.
  3. Doxological– Your theology should be focused around bringing glory to God first and foremost.
  4. Eschatological– Theology should be focused around the promises of Christ that are to come with the hope of a time spent in eternity with Jesus. We should be looking forward to the completion of God’s Kingdom.
  5. Christological– Our theology should be centered on the person and work of Christ. If Christ had not come and died in our place, we could not stand before the Father.
  6. Ecclesiastical– We should have an extreme love for the church, God’s called ones. We should not forsake the gathering of believers and always be aware that as the church, we are the bride of Christ.
  7. Motivational– Good Christ-centered theology should motivate us in ways that glorify God all the time. Every time we engage in theological discourse or communication with God, it should motivate us to holiness.

Dylan R.

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